My Home Remedies

Itching Skin Home Remedy Comments

6 Comments for the Itching Skin Home Remedy

Donna

Itching skin:

Baking Soda. Baking soda is the most common home remedy for itchy skin as well as skin rashes.

Colloidal Oatmeal.

Cool Water.

Lemon.

Apple Cider Vinegar.

Juniper Berries and Cloves.

Aloe vera.

Neem.

Wear organic cotton clothes.

Avoid soft drinks & drink plenty of water.

Avoid hot showers.

Avoid junk food.

Don't smoke.

Exercise regularly.

Reduce stress.

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Nick

Itchy skin, also known as pruritus, is an irritating and uncontrollable sensation that makes you want to scratch to relieve the feeling. The possible causes for itchiness range from internal illnesses, such as kidney or liver disease, to skin rashes, allergies, and dermatitis.

Anonymous

Possible causes of itchy skin include:

Dry skin. If you don't see a crop of bright, red bumps or some other dramatic change in the itchy area, dry skin (xerosis) is a likely cause. Dry skin usually results from older age or environmental factors such as long-term use of air conditioning or central heating, and washing or bathing too much.

Skin conditions and rashes. Many skin conditions itch, including eczema (dermatitis), psoriasis, scabies, lice, chickenpox and hives. The itching usually affects specific areas and is accompanied by other signs, such as red, irritated skin or bumps and blisters.

Internal diseases. Itchy skin can be a symptom of an underlying illness. These include liver disease, kidney failure, iron deficiency anemia, thyroid problems and cancers, including leukemia and lymphoma. The itching usually affects the whole body. The skin may look otherwise normal except for the repeatedly scratched areas.

Nerve disorders. Conditions that affect the nervous system — such as multiple sclerosis, diabetes mellitus, pinched nerves and shingles (herpes zoster) — can cause itching.

Irritation and allergic reactions. Wool, chemicals, soaps and other substances can irritate the skin and cause itching. Sometimes the substance, such as poison ivy or cosmetics, causes an allergic reaction. Food allergies also may cause skin to itch.

Drugs. Reactions to drugs, such as antibiotics, antifungal drugs or narcotic pain medications, can cause widespread rashes and itching.

Pregnancy. During pregnancy, some women experience itchy skin, especially on the abdomen and thighs. Also, itchy skin conditions, such as dermatitis, can worsen during pregnancy.

Anonymous

Oatmeal for itching

Call it the medicine porridge. Oatmeal's avenanthramides block the release of inflammatory compounds, dramatically reducing itchiness. Grind 2 cups uncooked oatmeal into a coarse powder in a blender. Add 1/4 cup baking soda, mix, and store in a jar. Add 1 cup to a warm bath to soothe sunburned skin, or mix a handful with water until thick, and then apply the paste to relieve poison ivy.

Anonymous

Extra virgin coconut oil for eczema

Perspiration, sunscreen, and even sunlight can cause eczema flare-ups, so cozy up to coconut oil. It contains lauric acid and its derivative, monolaurin, which kill bacteria. Staph bacteria is common in people with eczema, perpetuating the redness, itch, and inflammation. Apply coconut oil twice a day to the affected area for at least 4 weeks. Find it at many supermarkets and natural food stores.

Anonymous

Herbs especially suited for use in healing and protecting the skin include rose hips, evening primrose oil, green tea, echinacea, sage, ginseng, calendula, burdock root, rosemary, aloe, dandelion, lavender, and chamomile. Any herbal tea that cleanses the blood can be used to improve the skin.

Aaron

8 Natural Remedies for Itchy and Irritated Skin:

1. Clay

Put a bit of bentonite or Montmorillonite clay on it! Clay is very helpful for itching and a number of other skin issues such as acne. It particularly helps heal venomous stings and bites, like from bees, wasps and spiders. The clay helps draw the venom out of the skin, which will help relieve the pain and let the sting heal more quickly.

Use virgin, untreated clay, such as this one. Green clay (often called montmorillonite or bentonite clay) is the most powerful type. (For more information on the amazing healing power of clay, I highly recommend reading The Clay Cure by Ran Knishinsky).

claypackHow to use it: Mix the clay in a bowl or cup with a bit of filtered water until it has a creamy consistency like peanut butter (like in the picture at the top of the page). Then, just dab the clay paste onto itchy areas, let it dry, then rinse or peel it off.

How to do a clay pack: Spread the clay on a piece of clean, porous fabric (i.e., wool, muslin, cotton, flannel). Then place the clay-covered cloth to the irritated area, with the clay directly touching the skin (see the picture on the right). You can use bandaging tape or wrap it in plastic wrap to keep the cloth in place and protect your clothing and furniture. Keep the clay pack on for about 4 hours, or until the clay is hard and dry.

2. Apple Cider Vinegar

This isn’t the first time I’ve sung the praises of the uber-versatile ACV, and I suspect it won’t be the last. Apple cider vinegar is an effective antiseptic, anti-fungal and anti-bacterial agent that relieves itching, especially itching associated with dry skin (for example: sunburns and dandruff). It’s also popularly used for pets with dry, itchy skin as well, by adding a few cupfuls to their bath water.

How to use it: Just put a few drops of it onto a cotton ball or washcloth and dab it on to the affected area. Use raw, organic, unfiltered apple cider vinegar (Bragg’s is a good brand) with the “mother,” a strand-like sediment floating at the bottom of the bottle that contains raw enzymes and beneficial bacteria.

3. Clay + Apple Cider Vinegar

Combine the anti-itch properties of both of these skin soothers at the same time!

How to use it: Follow the instructions for using clay topically or as a clay pack, just substitute apple cider vinegar instead of water when making your clay. It will fizz up a bit, so just add a tiny amount of vinegar at a time until you reach the desired consistency.

4. Peppermint Leaves

Peppermint is great for bug bites and itching, as it provides a cooling sensation that’ll give you welcome relief.

How to use it: The quickest, easiest way is to crush up the leaves and rub the peppermint directly onto the skin. You could even freeze the crushed peppermint leaves into ice cubes for a cooling double-whammy, as the cold of the ice cubes also helps to numb the affected area and bring down swelling and inflammation. Always use clean, filtered water.

5. Fresh Basil Leaves

Basil leaves contains anti-itch compounds called camphor and thymol. This is my personal go-to trick for bug bites, as it’s so quick and easy. Plus, rubbing the leaf onto the skin satisfies the compulsive urge to scratch.

How to use it: Crush up the leaves and rub directly onto the skin.

6. Aloe Vera

We love aloe vera for just about every kind of skin irritation. Aloe is probably best-known for its ability to heal sunburns, but it’s extremely versatile as it soothes the skin and relieves swelling and irritation. If you live in Southern California, there’s probably an 85\\% chance it’s already growing in your yard.

How to use it: Break off a leaf from the plant, and cut it open lengthwise from top to bottom with a knife. Scoop out the gooey gel inside, and rub it directly onto irritated skin. If you have extra left over, you can keep it refrigerated in an airtight container for up to a week.

7. Fruit Peels

Silvana, the Gerson Institute’s Director of Education, also turned me on to a cool trick. Rub bug bites with a banana peel. Another Gerson staffer also suggested watermelon rind.

This is a great way to re-purpose kitchen scraps that might otherwise be thrown out! But, this method does have a potential drawback: the fruity scent may attract bugs. This may be a better choice for using indoors.

How to use it: Rub peel or rind onto the affected area.

8. Oatmeal

Oatmeal contains compounds called avenanthramides that reduce inflammation. This is a popular trick that’s been around for ages; I can remember my mom making me take oatmeal baths when I had chicken pox as a little kid. It’s also commonly used for poison ivy and eczema. You can add oatmeal to your bath, or make a poultice.

How to use it: To make an oatmeal poultice, add a bit of water to a cup or bowl of plain, organic, uncooked oatmeal (ground or steel-cut work best for this), then let it sit for a few minutes until it reaches a paste-like consistency. Apply the paste to the itchy area as needed.

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